MUSEOLOGY

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aljazeeraamerica:

Opinion: Why Instagram is good for the arts

It’s a Saturday afternoon at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. A young man and woman wander through the 19th- and Early 20th-Century European Paintings and Sculpture galleries. They pause in front of Henri Regnault’s Salomé, a portrait of the notorious biblical femme fatale who, after performing a sexy dance for her stepdad, Herod, requested John the Baptist’s head on a silver platter. “She kind of looks like JLo,” says the woman. “God, you’re right,” replies the man. They simultaneously raise their iPhones and snap a picture.
After they move along, I take their place in front of Salomé. Her dark curls fall seductively by her bare shoulders. Her head tilts with a smirk, and her right hand rests on her hip. She gives off a definite fly-girl vibe. I take out my iPhone and a few minutes later Instagram my portrait of the portrait. I use the most common filter, which is #nofilter. Others see it in my feed. Some like it with a heart. And thus, a French artist who’s been dead for more than 140 years, a random duo at the Met and my followers on Instagram and I are all in conversation. And isn’t that the point of art?

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(Photo: crol373/Flickr)

Thoughts? I’m typically pretty a anti-screen (phone, tablet, digital label, whatever), but this blog makes a point worth considering.

aljazeeraamerica:

Opinion: Why Instagram is good for the arts

It’s a Saturday afternoon at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. A young man and woman wander through the 19th- and Early 20th-Century European Paintings and Sculpture galleries. They pause in front of Henri Regnault’s Salomé, a portrait of the notorious biblical femme fatale who, after performing a sexy dance for her stepdad, Herod, requested John the Baptist’s head on a silver platter. “She kind of looks like JLo,” says the woman. “God, you’re right,” replies the man. They simultaneously raise their iPhones and snap a picture.

After they move along, I take their place in front of Salomé. Her dark curls fall seductively by her bare shoulders. Her head tilts with a smirk, and her right hand rests on her hip. She gives off a definite fly-girl vibe. I take out my iPhone and a few minutes later Instagram my portrait of the portrait. I use the most common filter, which is #nofilter. Others see it in my feed. Some like it with a heart. And thus, a French artist who’s been dead for more than 140 years, a random duo at the Met and my followers on Instagram and I are all in conversation. And isn’t that the point of art?

Read more

(Photo: crol373/Flickr)

Thoughts? I’m typically pretty a anti-screen (phone, tablet, digital label, whatever), but this blog makes a point worth considering.

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I learned that good judgment comes from experience and that experience grows out of mistakes.
Omar Bradley, U.S. Army general

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archivesofamericanart:

Real-life Monuments Woman, art historian, and Commandeur of the Legion of Honor, Rose Valland was the inspiration for the character Claire Simone as portrayed by Cate Blanchett in the new film. See our blog for more about Valland and other real people who inspired characters in the movie, and check out our exhibit dedicated to the Monuments Men.
Rose Valland at the Wiesbaden Central Collecting Point, 1946 April 24 / unidentified photographer. Thomas Carr Howe papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

archivesofamericanart:

Real-life Monuments Woman, art historian, and Commandeur of the Legion of Honor, Rose Valland was the inspiration for the character Claire Simone as portrayed by Cate Blanchett in the new film. See our blog for more about Valland and other real people who inspired characters in the movie, and check out our exhibit dedicated to the Monuments Men.

Rose Valland at the Wiesbaden Central Collecting Point, 1946 April 24 / unidentified photographer. Thomas Carr Howe papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.